Russian Sage Cottage

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Here’s another painting from the workshop I was fortunate to take last week from Ruidoso artist Patsy Blasdell.  Again, this was from a photo I’ve taken in the northeast of El Paso and I’ve been fascinated by the image, and the challenge of it, but never got up the courage to actually try it.  At the workshop I decided that I would challenge myself to try those kind of paintings, and I’m happy I did!

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Apples a la Blasdell

Apples a la Blasdell

This was done in the last day of Patsy Blasdell’s workshop put on by the NMWS Southern Chapter. The apples are made from a variety of oranges, reds and red purples with spots of turquoise in them in fact.  Fun fun! Colors are used throughout the piece to give it harmony.  This is a half sheet, one of only several I’ve done in that size.

I learned the most this day by watching how she paints, and hearing her thought process as she proceeds.  Because the paper is wet thoroughly both front and back, and put on a glossy surface, it stays wet for an hour or two, less when it’s really dry in the room.  I was focused on how she blends on the paper and thoughtfully places a stroke, evaluates, it thinks about the patterns of lights and darks she wants, and then places more strokes, mingling the colors on the paper.  She works top to bottom with the board and paper almost on a vertical on an easel.  I used that position to make the drips along the bottom portion of this half sheet.

There is so much more to say about what I learned in this workshop, but frankly, I have to get painting again today!  so more later…thanks for stopping by!

Workshop day 1

This workshop is right up my alley. The paper is really wet and scrubbed front and back and put on plexiglass and it will stay wet for hours. And we are focusing on darknd light patterns throughout. 

In the ref photo you will see scurge which flowers in January here among prickly pear.  

The teacher looks like and talks like my sweet sister in law Martha but with a mid texas accent rather than a North Carolina one. Love it!

Buzzing in the Mountain Laurel

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Buzzing in the Mountain Laurel #1

Buzzing in the Mountain Laurel #2 on Yupo_Rachel_murphree_Watercolor

Buzzing in the Mountain Laurel #2 on Yupo

These are two pieces that I just framed yesterday for the Colors of the Wild show opening this Friday at the Crossland Gallery, 500 W. Paisano.  The theme is animals, wild or domesticated, and while I was painting plein air my early blooming Texas Mountain Laurel bush, I was amazed at the wild buzzing activity of the big black bees that swarmed the strong smelling flower.  They were very busy getting the most they could out of the hanging pendulous blossom bunches.  They were the “star attraction” for the bees as they are for me, but  I am also drawn to the new and older seed pods that remain on the shrub.  They are beautiful to me in a different understated way.

The second day I worked on Yupo paper, rather than traditional watercolor paper, and that’s always a “wild” ride!  The smooth synthetic almost plasticky surface of Yupo shakes up all the normal expectations of how you use the pigments because they continue moving and blending for long periods of time, and they also can easily be wiped away to “fix” a problem, but the wiping creates its own unique set of issues to solve.  I’m just starting to use this surface for watercolor, but I’m having fun playing! I will be demonstrating the process of watercolor on Yupo on Sunday, May 7th at the International Museum of Art’s Elevate Your Art fundraiser, auctioning 8″ x 10″ artworks donated by local artists.

 

At the beach

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No, my excuse for being away from my blog was NOT that I was “at the beach”….if only that were true!  This was from a class exercise this past week done from a photo provided by the teacher.  It was fun to do, playing with my favorite colors of blue and orange.  In this case those colors in particular were cerulean chromium and quin burnt scarlet and quin burnt orange.

This has been a busy busy month for me with extra pressures coming from all sides:  gathering together my figures and setting up an inventory for tax season in my first year of selling art; having some kind of flu that knocked me out for much longer than usual, or I expected, and parenting stuff…oh yes, and painting and framing for two shows.

But I’m back, and on April 19th I’ll be doing a presentation on my 30 in 30 painting challenge experiences for the local Rio Bravo Watercolor group so I’m going to rev up and do a “mini” challenge:  15 days of the 30 in 30 so that I have new work to show.  So stay tuned for that.

Another moonlight piece

This was a fun piece done in a class where we wadded up the paper while dry to get texture, even tears, in the surface.  We then wet it and worked wet in wet.  I like how the wrinkles helped add interest to the mountains.  Other elements that work well are the papa, mama, baby bear size and details of the flowers and lost and found edges.

What do you think?

Early bloomer 2, also in plein air

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I spent some time today sketching and painting small images of the Texas Mountain Laurel.  This is the most successful of the three.

The hardest part for me is doing the foliage and dealing with the muted activity of what is going on behind the foreground foliage and how to express that all without going in after the firm edges of the leaves and adding background.  On this one I did lighter leaves and laid darker and varied ones on top.

texas mountain laurel ref photo (1).jpg

I’m going to try another wet in wet approach first, as I did yesterday with mingled colors of lights and mediums, not committing myself to placing the darks from the beginning, leaving soft edged areas of whiteness to fill in with blossoms and planning where to put the pods.  In that way some lighter leaves can be lifted out or negatively painted along with positive leaves.

What I’ve had success in is using the brush stroke to make a leaf in one stroke. Happy with that.  The leaves follow along rhythmically along a curved or straight thin stem and those lines could lead the eye through the painting, but one risks having too repetitive shapes, so playing with lost and found edges would help that.

texas-mountain-laurel-ref-photo-2

The blossoms are best done with mixing the permanent rose and ultramarine blue, leaning more toward the blue and going in later with drops of water and/or lifting our sworls of light to make the petal patterns that also go in pairs rhythmically on a with darker semi closed petals at the bottom of each pair.

As an aside, the wind was gusting at time today so that I had to hold down my easel while painting!  Next time I shall have to remember to hook my bag with water bottle to the bottom of the easel to weight it down.

Early Bloomer

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At least this year, my Texas Mountain Laurel bush is blooming two weeks earlier than usual.  I’m so glad I wandered over to check on whether it was in bud, and there are many clusters that are already open.  If you don’t know this bush, the clusters smell like grape koolaid, and it was the first shrub I planted when we moved in a long time ago.  I went out after 4 to paint it in the afternoon sun and shadows, and I feel like after several years, I finally have a handle on how to express the blooms.  Expect to see more paintings over the next week.  One of my favorite parts of the bush are the seed pods that linger and over several years they turn rusty and blue but in the first years they are light tan.  can you see them in the painting?

Cholla Trio

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Here’s another piece that I’ve finished and I’m really happy with it! The thorns are made by scratching on the paper surface to add more texture to the negative pained thorns and segment edges of the cactus itself.

If you remember here’s what it looked like in an earlier post.

So what did I learn from doing this?  First that negative painting to preserve lights is not that difficult.  Negative painting is when you create an image by painting what is around it  I did that on the branch, and also to create a stamen and pistils in the center of the main bloom.  I remembered to describe the elements in varying amounts of specificity.  In other words, not all of the blooms are equally detailed or in focus which gives the viewer something to imagine and fill in the blanks.  I also went ahead and put in the background at the same time as the focal flowers and foliage which helped have some edges soft, some edges sharp (that’s known as lost and found edges).  Plus I learned that all this was FUN to do!

Finished! Here’s Shiloh….

shiloh_rachel_murphree_watercolor

I took the painting down to Shiloh’s folks and they loved it so now I’ll get it framed and take it down to them. We are using a white on white mat to pull out the white of his fur with a dark frame.  I am thrilled they are so happy with him!

And now while I’m in the dog painting mode, I’m starting work on a painting for my sister in law of her sweet golden retriever Murphy who is no longer with us.  here’s the initial sketch of him:

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In related news I have the opportunity of putting pet paintings down at the Crossroads Animal Hospital which I’m very excited about.  I’ll frame prints of Tulie (below) and Shiloh and perhaps some others and include information on doing commissions and how to get in touch with me.  I am quite thankful for this opportunity.

Here's Lookin at You

Here’s Lookin at you. 16 x 20 framed $225

That’s it for now!  more soon as I intend on blogging daily in March.